Open top AEC Regent V

Making a change from the usual Bristol Lodekkas featured on this blog is this handsome AEC Regent V, one of Devon General’s 1957 batch of 59-seat double decks.

VDV818-Exeter-sightseeing

I took this photo just before boarding the bus in Exeter during a special event in May 1994 involving 2 steam locomotives. BR Standard Class 4 tank locos, 80079 and 80080 were visiting the west country for a tour of branchlines radiating from Exeter. This Devon General Regent, then owned and operated by Red Bus Services (and having been restored by them the previous year), was being used to run a sightseeing tour around Exeter. We picked up the tour outside Exeter St David’s Station and were treated to some aural delights as the raucous straight through exhaust bellowed mightily as we climbed up to the city centre from the station.

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Bristol AVW engine wanted

Before anyone comments, I know they’re about as rare as hen’s teeth. In terms of surviving half cab buses, those retaining their Bristol AVW engines are comparatively few.

NFM67-aug-rally

This sad looking Bristol KSW joined the Crosville heritage fleet in 2012, fitted with its original Bristol AVW engine. Sadly, it would not turn over and after stripping it down, the restorers decided that the damaged block could not be economically repaired.

If you know of the whereabouts of a redundant Bristol AVW engine, or indeed have one yourself, please let me know. It doesn’t have to be a runner or even be complete just as long as it can sacrifice a few components to allow this fine ex-Crosville bus to return to action powered by an AVW. It would be so sad (and would ironically reflect the situation in the 1960s/70s) if a Gardner 6LW unit had to be fitted just to get the bus on the road. The folks at Crosville are determined to make this restoration as thorough and authentic as possible so that means retaining the Bristol AVW if at all possible. A sensible price will be paid for a suitable item.

Please contact Crosville on 01934 635259, email them at contact@crosvillemotorservices.co.uk or just leave a comment here. Thank you!

Last bus from Salisbury Bus Station

January 5th 2014 dawned with a sharp frost and bright sunshine, which later turned to cloud and persistent drizzle. Perhaps this summed up the mood of those who attended a special event to mark the closure of Salisbury Bus Station.

Wiltshire’s capital city has had a central bus station for 75 years but now, due to the ageing buildings and the changing nature of the company which has inherited them, the city has decided that it can do without the familiar starting point for most of its bus services.

Thanks to a remarkably timed contact with the owners of a surviving Wilts & Dorset Bristol Lodekka, I had the privilege of driving this bus during the running day. The photo below, taken by Dave Mant, shows me leaving the bus station with the first departure of the day to Nunton and Bodenham.

OHR919-leaving-Salisbury-Bus-Station

Note the similarity between this and my shot of the same location which I took in 1973. Fleet no 628, an LD6G which was new in December 1956, has been owned since it was taken out of service as a driver trainer, by two delightful brothers. They also own a Hants & Dorset FS6G. I met up with them at the bus station and before I knew it, was climbing into the cab just before departure time. Allan and Kevin were happy for me to take the bus out on the first trip because I knew my way round the route, thanks to my customary homework (and a dry run in the car the night before!)

The bus station was rapidly filling with heritage buses, most of which had a local connection. Also adding to the general busyness was a good number of enthusiasts, local residents and bus industry management. As soon as I drove the Lodekka onto the departure stand, people flocked to board our bus. I had a few moments to compose myself. It was both emotional and nerve-wracking, sitting behind the wheel of a bus I had seen and ridden on as a boy while also focussing on the task of driving as faultlessly as possible.

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