First wedding duty for refurbished Bristol FSF

Not only was I very glad to be offered this duty but the sunshine also turned up and bathed the day with warmth and brightness. The wedding couple had chosen Crosville DFG81 (891VFM), built in 1962 as a closed top double deck bus, as their transport for the day.

891VFM Boulevard

This vehicle is no stranger to these pages but it has benefitted recently from a mechanical overhaul, some bodywork repairs and a repaint into Tilling Cream. The icing on the cake, as I’m sure you will agree from the photos, is the application of period advertising. As a former graphic designer I was very pleased to see this, as I think it adds a touch of authenticity to an already stunning bus.

Unlike some heritage buses and coaches I’ve driven, this FSF started readily as it has always done. Others seem very reluctant and many’s the time I’ve listened with a sinking feeling as the batteries run out of puff, requiring booster pack assistance to get the engine started.

Once all my checks had been done I drove out of town and across what was once the main runway of RAF Locking. Most of the former airfield is now being developed for housing and many of the new roads on the estate have been given names relating to its former life as an airfield such as Gypsy Moth Road, Leonides Avenue and Rapide Way*.

The pickup point was in a fairly narrow residential road in Locking village and I had earlier flagged up the possibility of difficulties with gaining access, if parked cars became an issue. Thankfully I was able to weave my way between them successfully and arrived in good time. The bride and groom plus others in the wedding party were delighted with the bus and, although there were less than a dozen of them, they boarded noisily in the morning sunshine.

An extra pickup point was requested on the way for more family members so, once they were on board, we trundled onwards. By now I had settled into Lodekka mode and did my best to give my passengers a pleasant ride with no grinding or crashing of gears. Thankfully the only noises from the gearbox were musical ones!

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