Crosville Bus & Steam Rally 2016

Taking part in Crosville’s Bus & Steam Rally this year gave me a variety of jobs, including possibly my last chance to drive a vintage bus on a regular bus route.

hlj44-at-crosville-rally

During the run-up to the rally I found myself more involved in the planning stages than I had envisaged so it was quite a relief to watch the day unfold successfully. In a new – but possibly one-off – joint venture with the Helicopter Museum in Weston-super-Mare, Crosville sited its Bus & Steam Rally at the Museum. The company’s bus depot was also open, of which more later.

afj727t-in-crosville-depot

I travelled up on the Friday before the rally, bringing a coach with me. This was Western National 3307 (Bristol LH6L AFJ727T) which belongs to WHOTT. The LH was parked up inside the Crosville Motor Services garage until it was required for the rally.

My main concern, having planned the layout of the static exhibits, was whether we would be able to fit all the resident and visiting buses along two sides of the rectangular site. Thankfully, due to the fact that a certain number of vehicles were always out in service, there was just about enough room.

I helped with setting up early on the previous day and began by touring the site with the Crosville Safety Officer, who also acted as Chief Marshal. The rest of the morning was spent ferrying various buses over from the Crosville garage to the Museum site, with Southern National 2700 (HDV626E) acting as shuttle bus for the drivers.

trade-stall-at-crosville-rally

The Museum staff did a great job setting up tables for the Trade Stalls within the Museum buildings. We’d had so many stall entries that several more were allocated spaces outside with the buses. Thank goodness we had dry weather!

The day of the rally itself brought ideal weather – mild, mostly sunny. I began by helping in the garage where, a few days previously, the mortal remains of GWR 4-6-0 ‘Thornbury Castle’ had been placed on display. Some of the modern bus and coach fleet were also tastefully arranged nearby.

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Crosville Bus & Steam Rally 2016 update #1

Plans are coming together for the Crosville Bus & Steam Rally 2016, at which I plan to be very active! The date is Sunday September 11th.

4-Bristol-Ls-at-Crosville-Rally-2014

Back in 2014 there was a rally and running day based at the seafront at Weston-super-Mare but this year’s event is centred on the Helicopter Museum in Locking Moor Road. Since the 2014 rally Crosville has expanded further, adding fresh vehicles to its heritage fleet and many others to its modern fleet of local service buses and coaches.

For this reason Crosville has struck up a partnership with the Helicopter Museum which – like Crosville – is based on what used to be RAF Weston-super-Mare, albeit on opposite sides of the airfield site. It seems quite appropriate to team up with a museum which celebrates another form of transport history. There is ample room for static displays, indoor areas for society and trade stalls as well as the added attraction of the museum itself. I’ve never been there myself and am looking forward to seeing what’s there.

New for this year is the addition of a steam section. It was originally planned to have Crosville’s own Sentinel DG6P Steam Bus ‘Elizabeth’ in action, fresh from restoration. However, as is often the way with these projects, work is behind schedule and the steam bus won’t be ready in time for the Rally. There will still be plenty of steam power present though as several entries have already been received from traction engine and steam roller owners.

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Early Bristol RE returns to Crosville

After being away from base for almost exactly a year, I had the honour of bringing a refurbished Bristol RE back to Weston-super-Mare.

HDV626E-at-RBW

1967-built Southern National 2700 (HDV626E) has been receiving the attentions of restorers at Reliance Bus Works in Stoke-on-Trent since January 2015 and I was happy to be offered the chance to bring it back to the Crosville Motor Services depot again.

This particular vehicle is very significant as it is the earliest surviving Bristol RELL3 chassis. In fact, it was only the 12th example off the production line at Brislington.

I arrived by train and the proprietor kindly offered to pick me up from the station. The only trouble was, my train was diverted to Crewe at the last minute due to a faulty set of points just south of Stoke. After a hasty phone call, I jumped on a train again and we finally met up at Kidsgrove.

2700 had been parked facing the road, ready for my departure. She looked magnificent inside and out. Maybe not ‘concours’ condition but that doesn’t matter. The folks at Crosville just wanted her to be brought up to spec for private hire mechanically and to have some bodywork issues sorted out. A fresh application of Tilling Green and Cream was the finishing touch, together with some repainting inside.

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2015 on the buses – hopes and dreams

With 2015 safely under way, I am now looking forward to more adventures with classic buses so I thought I’d share with you some of my hopes and dreams. Some are almost certain to happen, others may just be pipe dreams!

KFM893-first-duty-3

I will be continuing my work with Crosville Motor Services, a fairly new company which has successfully revived the old Crosville name and seems to have a very bright future. It has an enviable collection of heritage buses of mostly Bristol manufacture and I have driven many of them since joining them as a part time driver in 2012. My private hire duties for Crosville will continue in 2015, mostly weddings. The first of these isn’t until March but, as the year progresses, I hope to drive some new additions to the heritage fleet. If you’re a regular blog follower (and, if you’re a new one, welcome aboard!) you will have read that I took two buses north for refurbishment a few weeks ago. I may be offered the chance to bring them back when they’re finished but, more excitingly, they are being added to the active fleet for this year.

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Southern National Bristol RELL goes north

Following on swiftly from my long trek north with a Bristol K6A I delivered another bus to be repainted last week.

HDV626E-at-depot

This was not such an arduous journey, for two reasons. This 1967-built Bristol RELL is a faster bus and, secondly, my destination was not so far away from the Crosville depot. Southern National 2700 (HDV626E) is reasonably presentable but, as the plan is for it to join the heritage fleet for private hire at some point, it really needs some tidying up and a new paint job.

2700 has had a succession of private owners since it left Western National service (it was transferred from Southern National in 1969) and has been seen frequently at running days and rallies. In fact she was at the Crosville depot in 2012, when her most recent owner brought her along to the Crosville Running Day.

My task was to deliver the bus to Reliance Bus Works, who are to carry out work to the brakes and chassis before re-applying her Tilling Green and Cream livery. After shunting a Bristol KSW out of the way, I checked the oil and started her up. The Gardner 6HLX engine filled the garage with its throaty sound, along with a haze of blue smoke which soon cleared as the engine warmed up. As before, much of the preparation had been done beforehand but I drove the bus outside and completed my walkaround checks as usual just for my own peace of mind. A full tank of fuel was required for the journey up to Stoke-on-Trent and, once this was done, I set off.

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A visit to Cobus with a Bristol K6A

Last week I undertook another marathon journey to Yorkshire with a bus from the Crosville Motor Services heritage fleet. TD895 (HLJ44) is a 1949 Bristol K6A and she joined Crosville in 2013 but has not been used since then as it was felt she needed some considerable work done to bring her up to the standards required for regular use on private hire work.

HLJ44-before-Cobus

So I turned up bright and early on Monday last week to take the K up to Cobus, the bus and coach restorers in Yorkshire where I took Bedford OB MFM39 last year. In the days preceding my journey, Crosville staff had been busy preparing the bus for the long trek north. The interior had been gutted some time before so all the seat frames, poles and panels had been stowed carefully inside. The 6-cylinder AEC engine had been partially rebuilt some months previously so a new set of batteries were fitted and some road tests completed.

The fuel tank had been topped up to the brim so all I needed to do was to carry out my walkaround checks. One curious aspect to this bus is that it has been kept in original condition, even down to the exterior lighting arrangements. While checking the brake lights I saw that there is a single, separate light near the offside tail lamp. When the indicator was checked I saw that there are no separate indicator lights – the tail lamp flashes and there are none at the front at all! Apparently, according to the Construction and Use Regulations, the bus is permitted to carry the lighting arrangements it was built with so it looks like I shall have to brush up on my hand signals just to be safe! Another aspect to this situation was to surface later in the journey but more on that later.

Apart from a short journey from Weston seafront back to the depot last summer, I haven’t driven a Bristol K before so I was looking forward to this journey very much. It soon became clear that it’s very much like a Bristol L to drive. Not surprising, as they have much in common. However, the AEC engine sounds very different and is probably the same unit as fitted to London Transport RT buses. I’m sure someone more knowledgeable than me will be along shortly to correct me! I soon felt right at home in the cab as I drove out of Weston and towards the M5 motorway. Despite its age, I found everything to be remarkably tight and rattle-free. Someone has done quite a lot of mechanical work I suspect. I found myself comparing the experience with Hants & Dorset 1220 (Bristol FLF DEL893C) which rattled and shook much more than this K which is 16 years older.

Owing to the partial engine rebuild I mentioned earlier I kept my speed under 35mph so that the engine could run-in adequately. I’m sure that, if opened up fully, she could probably do 40+. My progress, as you can imagine, felt painfully slow but I got used to it. I prepared myself to move into the hard shoulder if any artics left it late to pull out from behind me! As well as watching my mirrors like a hawk, I also watched the radiator filler cap in case she started to boil. I had no idea about the condition of the cooling system and how the bus would behave on a long journey but all was well. Apart from a few dribbles at the beginning (it had been filled to the brim) everything settled down nicely.

The miles passed by slowly until lunchtime, when I stopped at Tamworth Services for a break.

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Wanted: Autovac for Bristol K

As part of the maintenance work on newly-acquired Bristol K6A HLJ44, Crosville needs to replace part of the Autovac system.

HLJ44-autovac

More specifically, the pipes leading from the Autovac tank (marked in red in the photo) to the engine require replacement. Does anyone know where a set of these could be sourced or made? Answers on a postcard, cunningly disguised as a comment on this blog, to Busman John please.

In a nutshell, the Autovac sucks diesel fuel (in the case of this bus) from the main fuel tank and delivers it to the injectors of the engine via the auxilliary tank you can see mounted on the front bulkhead. Those who are interested in the inner workings of the system can follow this link which, appropriately for us, uses a photo of a double deck bus to illustrate the page.

This AEC-powered bus will be added to the Crosville heritage hire fleet next year and I for one am looking forward to driving it!